The Latest

Quite simply, Rockaway Tacos is worth the hype and worth the wait. If your a DFD, hit the beach, hit a taco, and if the sun is beating down - grab an italian ice in the line. You’re golden. 
Jul 29, 2014

Quite simply, Rockaway Tacos is worth the hype and worth the wait. If your a DFD, hit the beach, hit a taco, and if the sun is beating down - grab an italian ice in the line. You’re golden. 

Lobster Landing in Clinton, CT keeps their rolls simple. Just butter and lobster. And if you want it, a gluten free roll. 
Jul 29, 2014 / 1 note

Lobster Landing in Clinton, CT keeps their rolls simple. Just butter and lobster. And if you want it, a gluten free roll. 

Hot days, balmy nights and a fantastic tomato and potato harvest this year can leave you thinking two things: long lunches and long dinners. Put the summer bounty to good use with a Provencal Gratin. Surprisingly light, surprisingly easy, your guests heart will soon between sips of a cold, crisp white.
Jul 29, 2014 / 1 note

Hot days, balmy nights and a fantastic tomato and potato harvest this year can leave you thinking two things: long lunches and long dinners. Put the summer bounty to good use with a Provencal Gratin. Surprisingly light, surprisingly easy, your guests heart will soon between sips of a cold, crisp white.

 
momofuku:

8.5.2014
tickets + more info on 7/15 via longplay.momofuku.com
Jul 10, 2014 / 16 notes

 

momofuku:

8.5.2014

tickets + more info on 7/15 via longplay.momofuku.com

You can have your cake. You just can’t eat it. 

Then again, maybe you can. 

Lilly Vanilli’s Shattered Glass CakeFind a cake recipe you like and bake 2 x 8” layers and 1 x 6” layer, make up some frosting (I used vanilla) and a batch of sugar glass in any colours you like (recipe below). Leave the glass to cool, then crack to form shards. When the cakes have cooled completely, use a palette knife to spread the frosting between the layers as you stack them up. Then ice the outside, starting from the centre of the top, spreading the icing out, then down and around the sides of the cake. Press shards of the sugar glass all over the cake so they are jutting out.Sugar ShardsSugar glass is what they use in films whenever you see glass being smashed – it’s hard and transparent, more brittle than glass. Because sugar glass is hygroscopic, you should smash it into shards soon after it is fully cooled or it will start to absorb liquid and soften, losing its brittle quality. If you want to make different-coloured sugar shards, you will need to make a fresh batch for each one – don’t try to split the mix and colour it separately, as you have to work quickly with the liquid before it sets.
Preparation time: 10 minutesCooking time: 25 minutesMakes: 800g
Ingredients:500ml water785g granulated sugarA few drops of gel food colouring (optional)250ml liquid glucose¼ tsp cream of tartar
Apparatus:One shallow baking tray, lined with foil, with no gapsOil spraySugar thermometer

Recipe:Spray your prepared baking tray all over with the oil spray at least 30 minutes before you want to use it.  Place the water, sugar, food colouring (if using), liquid glucose and cream of tartar into a pan with a sugar thermometer attached and stir to combine. Bring to the boil over a medium heat, until it reaches 150°C – approximately 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the mixture cool to 130°C – approximately 10 minutes, then pour the mixture quickly and carefully into the oiled baking tray. Allow to cool completely. Pop the sugar sheet very carefully out of the tray, then, using a meat tenderiser, hit the sheet carefully in the centre so it cracks into shards.
Jun 25, 2014

You can have your cake. You just can’t eat it. 

Then again, maybe you can. 

Lilly Vanilli’s Shattered Glass Cake
Find a cake recipe you like and bake 2 x 8” layers and 1 x 6” layer, make up some frosting (I used vanilla) and a batch of sugar glass in any colours you like (recipe below). Leave the glass to cool, then crack to form shards. When the cakes have cooled completely, use a palette knife to spread the frosting between the layers as you stack them up. Then ice the outside, starting from the centre of the top, spreading the icing out, then down and around the sides of the cake. Press shards of the sugar glass all over the cake so they are jutting out.

Sugar Shards
Sugar glass is what they use in films whenever you see glass being smashed – it’s hard and transparent, more brittle than glass. Because sugar glass is hygroscopic, you should smash it into shards soon after it is fully cooled or it will start to absorb liquid and soften, losing its brittle quality. If you want to make different-coloured sugar shards, you will need to make a fresh batch for each one – don’t try to split the mix and colour it separately, as you have to work quickly with the liquid before it sets.

Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 25 minutes
Makes: 800g

Ingredients:
500ml water
785g granulated sugar
A few drops of gel food colouring (optional)
250ml liquid glucose
¼ tsp cream of tartar

Apparatus:
One shallow baking tray, lined with foil, with no gaps
Oil spray
Sugar thermometer

Recipe:
Spray your prepared baking tray all over with the oil spray at least 30 minutes before you want to use it.  Place the water, sugar, food colouring (if using), liquid glucose and cream of tartar into a pan with a sugar thermometer attached and stir to combine. Bring to the boil over a medium heat, until it reaches 150°C – approximately 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the mixture cool to 130°C – approximately 10 minutes, then pour the mixture quickly and carefully into the oiled baking tray. Allow to cool completely. Pop the sugar sheet very carefully out of the tray, then, using a meat tenderiser, hit the sheet carefully in the centre so it cracks into shards.

May 5, 2014 / 8,507 notes
themadfeed:

Nyapo’s Garden and the Terroir of MemoryMichael Twitty
On August 26, 2013, I hammered away at the gut-juiced log podium at MAD imploring the hundreds gathered to take note of the heritage of their food. I wanted them to consider their food’s stories and what those stories meant for the people who brought those foods into history, as well as their descendants and those from other backgrounds who enjoyed them and benefited from their import. 
One of the things I talked about was the connection between rice in the colonial and antebellum South and the people who were brought to grow it. Limited to a stretch of land on the Southeastern coast of the United States, rice cultivation in the dark malarial swamps was the most dangerous agricultural labor practiced in what would become the United States. It has been said that the human power needed to change those swamps into rice fields can be likened to the power needed to make the pyramids of Giza. Once those fields were created, however, they also gave rise to the wealthiest landed aristocracy in early North America; two successful rice crops made you the equivalent of a millionaire. 

Read More
Apr 10, 2014 / 9 notes

themadfeed:

On August 26, 2013, I hammered away at the gut-juiced log podium at MAD imploring the hundreds gathered to take note of the heritage of their food. I wanted them to consider their food’s stories and what those stories meant for the people who brought those foods into history, as well as their descendants and those from other backgrounds who enjoyed them and benefited from their import. 

One of the things I talked about was the connection between rice in the colonial and antebellum South and the people who were brought to grow it. Limited to a stretch of land on the Southeastern coast of the United States, rice cultivation in the dark malarial swamps was the most dangerous agricultural labor practiced in what would become the United States. It has been said that the human power needed to change those swamps into rice fields can be likened to the power needed to make the pyramids of Giza. Once those fields were created, however, they also gave rise to the wealthiest landed aristocracy in early North America; two successful rice crops made you the equivalent of a millionaire. 

Read More

Will go #hoe for a #taco. Sunny Sundays @ Santa Maria. Kreuzberg, Berlin.
Apr 7, 2014

Will go #hoe for a #taco. Sunny Sundays @ Santa Maria. Kreuzberg, Berlin.

Rhubabe.
Mar 29, 2014 / 1 note

Rhubabe.

Mar 29, 2014 / 3 notes

Spring has sprung in Berlin. Lighter and brighter tastes return to our plate. And rhubarb is once again a major food group - at least for a short time.

Unfortunately, not everyone can take cue from longer days and warmer winds (my heart goes to you New York). So in the mean time, find spring solice in Monica Ramos’  whimsical food illustrations that have graced the pages of Lucky Peach and Bitchslap.